Privacy Policy

Your privacy on the Internet is important to us. Since this site collects certain types of personal information from users in order that you can use this platform to contact your lawmakers, we feel you should fully understand the terms and conditions surrounding how that information is used. Registration on this site is voluntary. At various points on our website, we describe the types of personal information we collect at that point and how we handle such information. This privacy statement summarizes these descriptions of what information we collect online and how we use it.

Personal Information
We offer users the option to provide us personal information about themselves. We use this information to enable users to communicate with their lawmakers and to personalize user sessions. We will not reveal, rent, or otherwise make available any personal information or email addresses to third parties.

Cookies
A cookie is a small data file that certain websites write to your hard drive when you visit them. A cookie file can contain information, such as a user ID that the site uses to match with the registration information you’ve already given to us. But the only personal information a cookie can contain is information you supply yourself. A cookie can’t read data off your hard disk or read cookie files created by other sites. This site uses cookies to authenticate the user and keep track of the user session.

Registration
When you register, this website uses a cookie to store a unique user ID. We use this user ID to identify you in our database, which enables you to enter and use this site for communicating with your elected officials without having to register each time. Registration is voluntary.

Use of Registration Information
This website uses any information voluntarily given by users to make sure that their communications are correctly delivered to their elected officials, and will not share this information with third parties. This information may be used, however, to gauge the effectiveness of certain grassroots activities.

We are committed to respecting the privacy and security of all visitors to our website. We recognize that when you choose to provide us with information about yourself, you trust us to protect your privacy and to provide you with choices about how that information is shared.We do not disclose to third parties any information it gathers from the website which could be used to track your individual access and navigation of our site. In order to maintain the integrity of the personal information you provide, we deploy computer encryption technology to protect your information from unauthorized access or release.

We may use email and street addresses voluntarily provided by site visitors to notify them of updates, products, services or upcoming events. Site visitors who do not wish to receive such notifications via email can choose to opt out of receiving such information at any time by so indicating either at time of registration, or upon receipt of any promotional email.

Non-identifiable website visitor data may be collected and used in aggregate to help shape and direct the creation and maintenance of content.

Email
It is your right to stop receiving email any time you choose and to only receive relevant and wanted email. We only collect and hold your email address in order to enable you to send communications to your legislators. You can unsubscribe from our email list at any time and for any reason. An unsubscribe link is included in every email, along with instructions.

SPAM and Policy Abuse
In spite of our precautions, there remains the possibility that a person will sign up someone else without their permission. If you think this has happened to you, please send an email with details to info@workforcefairness.com

This website may contain links to other sites. Please be aware that we are not responsible for the privacy practices of other sites. We encourage users when they leave our site to read the privacy statements of each website that collects personally identifiable information. If you have any questions or concerns regarding what is done with information provided via this site, please e-mail your concerns to info@workforcefairness.com

Tell Congress: Stop the PRO Act

TELL CONGRESS: STOP THE PRO ACT

WFI is working to prevent passage of the so-called Protecting the Right to Organize Act (PRO Act)—a wholesale labor reform package that takes the current careful balance of labor rules and tips it greatly in the favor of labor bosses and forced collective bargaining. 

The PRO Act robs workers of the right to a secret ballot to form a union, forces representation on employers and employees without a vote of approval, and exposes workers’ personal contact information to union bosses seeking to organize a workplace. And that’s just the start. 

Tell your representative today to vote "NO" on the PRO Act. 

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Featured Blog

AZ Daily Sun--Coconino Voices: PRO Act legislation would hurt local businesses

— 05.13.2021 —
By: Julie Pastrik Arizona businesses and workers have had an incredibly challenging year given the economic slowdown that followed in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. However, local businesses and industries across the state are resilient and on the road to a strong recovery that will mean more jobs for Arizona workers and increased economic development to strengthen our communities. That is, as long as Congress does not move forward with potentially devastating legislation that would hurt local employers and employees alike while impeding our state’s economic recovery. Unfortunately, some members of Congress seem determined to do just that by pushing through the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act. As harmless as the name may sound, the PRO Act would have serious repercussions for local businesses, particularly smaller ones, while undermining long-standing rights for employees and threatening the growing gig economy that has helped provide much-needed income for so many during this time. Arizona is fortunate to have leaders like Senators Mark Kelly and Kyrsten Sinema, who have both refrained from joining the vast majority of their Democratic colleagues in cosponsoring the PRO Act. In a slap in the face to Arizona workers, the PRO Act removes one of the most fundamental rights a worker has when it comes to voting in elections to determine whether to unionize: the secret ballot. Instead, workers could be forced to sign union authorization cards in front of other employees, their employer, or union organizers. This bill would also destroy workers’ right to privacy by allowing unions access to personal information, including their home address and personal phone number. If that doesn’t open the door to union intimidation and harassment, I don’t know what does. As if that was not bad enough, the PRO Act would create major new challenges for Arizona businesses, making it harder for them to create jobs, expand in their communities, and even keep their doors open. It would redefine what it means to be a “joint employer” under national labor law, greatly complicating existing relationships between franchisors and franchisees as well as between business owners, contractors, subcontractors, and vendors and suppliers. At the same time, it would interfere with attorney-client confidentiality and make it much more difficult for small businesses to secure a legal advice on labor issues. Particularly harmful during these times, the PRO Act would apply a failed policy from California to national labor law by using the “ABC” test to determine whether a worker is an independent contractor or employee. This makes it much harder to qualify as an independent contractor, threatening the freedom and flexibility that tens of thousands of Arizonans find in independent contracting and gig economy work. Ultimately, the PRO Act is bad public policy that only works for union leaders to inflate their falling ranks while threatening workers’ rights, undermining small businesses, and jeopardizing a growing part of our economy. This is not a good solution for Arizona, and Senators Sinema and Kelly should stay firm and not cosponsor this misguided legislation.
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